“The Best Book I Read in 2018”: Crisis Leadership, Misreading Scripture, Theological Education, Justice

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What’s the best book you read in 2018? We posed this question to our Intersect contributors, and we’ve shared their recommendations in recent weeks. (Read list 1list 2list 3list 4list 5list 6 and list 7.)

Today, Intersect contributors highlight books on crisis leadership, misreading scripture, theological education, justice and more. …Read More.


The Sound of Evil. The Sound of Hope.

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We recently heard the sounds of the celebration of evil. The sounds are haunting. The cheers and claps of New York state legislators as they celebrate the passing of the ironically named Reproductive Health Act. This legislation, which greatly expands women’s access to abortion, was signed into law by the governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo. Amid concerns that the Supreme Court will overturn Roe v. Wade, this new state law permits abortion to occur at any time during the nine months of pregnancy. …Read More.


#IAmGoing Weekend Reading

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4 Common Evangelism Mistakes and Why They Shouldn’t Stop You: D. Scott Hildreth

If you want to heap great shame on most evangelicals just say, “Tell me about the last person you shared Jesus with.”  

Most of us know why we should share our faith with unbelievers:

  • We obey the most basic commands in the Bible when we share the gospel.

  • Evangelism is the means for unbelievers being saved.

  • We experience a deeper faith as we evangelize.

Though we value evangelism, very few of us are actually doing it. According to recent research,  61% of Christians have not shared Christ in the past six months, and 25% have only shared with 1-2 people.  

I have spent the majority of my ministry teaching Christians how to be more evangelistic. In this post, I want to highlight 4 mistakes most Christians make in evangelism and why we need to stop making them.  …Read More.

Advocacy Teams 101: Meredith Cook

By the Lord’s grace, many missionaries enter the field and find solid Christian community with their fellow missionaries or local believers. However, many others find themselves dropped in a remote location, with little to no Christian witness. They become lonely and isolated without the fellowship of other believers. Others may experience conflict among their missionary team that arises out of culture shock, disagreements on strategy, unmet expectations, etc. In short, the missionary life is not easy.

But since the Bible sets up churches as the mechanism for sending, it seems the antidote for loneliness and isolation is built in. Yet, while some sending churches excel at keeping in touch with and supporting their missionaries from afar, other missionaries often feel forgotten by their sending churches.

Forgetfulness can be caused by many different things, such as the “out of sight, out of mind” paradigm. Or, the church completely outsources missionary sending—and therefore missionary care—to the sending agency. Or, they simply don’t know how to care for their missionaries once they are on the field.

Enter advocacy teams. As a church raises up and sends out missionaries, it can simultaneously raise up and equip groups of church members to take care of these missionaries. Here is a succinct explanation of advocacy teams and how you can implement them in your church. …Read More.

Few Churched Teenagers Become Devout Young Adults: Aaron Earls

Most young adults who attended church as a teenager say they believe in God today, but fewer consider themselves devout Christians. And as a whole, they have conflicting recollections about the churches they attended in high school.

LifeWay Research surveyed more than 2,000 American adults between the ages of 23 and 30 who attended a Protestant church twice a month or more for at least a year as a teenager.

Today, 39 percent say they consider themselves a devout Christian with a strong faith in God. Fewer consider themselves Christian, but not particularly devout (27 percent). Even fewer say they believe in God but are uncertain of Christianity (14 percent) or say they consider themselves spiritual, but not religious (11 percent).

Only a small number say they are uncertain about their belief in God (5 percent) or say they don’t believe in God or in any higher being (4 percent).

Two-thirds (66 percent) of those who attended church regularly in high school dropped out for at least one year as a young adult. …Read More.

10 Characteristics of Pastors I’ve Trusted: Chuck Lawless

I’ve written in the past about why church members don’t always trust pastors (check here and here). At the same time, though, I love pastors – and I want to be helpful. So, here are characteristics of pastors I’ve known well and trusted completely. …Read More.

The Tension Asian Christians Feel at Chinese New Year

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Do you know what year it is about to be? You may be thinking, “It’s only just became 2019. Are you thinking about 2020 already?” Actually, I am thinking about the quickly approaching year of the pig. Year of the pig? The world-wide celebration of Chinse New Year is quickly approaching.

This holiday is a special time for millions of people. But for Asian believers, the holiday presents unique challenges. …Read More.

Defining Value in the Absence of Work: A Thought Experiment

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God makes man in his likeness. 
Man makes machine in God’s likeness. 
Man “destroys” God. 
Machine replaces man as optimal producer.

While advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics are not the yet in the same category of the genetic achievements of Jurassic Park, Jeff Goldblum’s witty prophecy is easily adapted to our technological moment in time and the implications for the human experience potentially as disruptive as the predatory giants of Jurassic Park.

We generally acknowledge that the human mind is fragile. Vast segments of the American population are resorting to opioids and other prescription medications in record numbers to dampen depression and anxiety or simply handle that last mindless partisan rant on TV. Approximately 59,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2016, a 19 percent increase from the previous year. …Read More.